Archive for January, 2011

Possible Proposal Topics

Friday, January 28th, 2011

The three main topics that I wanted to do for my research paper are China’s Involvement in the Vietnam War, China in the Korea War and the present day political tensions between China and Japan.

Topic 1#- China’s Involvement in the Vietnam War

Their main involvement in the Vietnam War was when China was trying to invade Vietnam in 1979.   The sources that I have found so for this topic are “Beyond Betrayal” by Lorenz M. Luthi and China’s 1979 War With Vietnam a  Resentment by Xiaoming Zhang.

Topic 2#- China’s Involvement in the Korean War

In this war, China was on North Korea’s side, which who were against South Korea, The United States and their allies.  The main reason that China got involved in the Korean War because they did a joint diplomatic effort with the Soviet Union to save North Korea’s regime from South Korea and the United Nations.  The starting topic that I found so far was “A Survey: China and the Korean War” by Jun Yushida.

Topic #3- Present day relations with China and Japan

This topic is about the present day political disagreements and tensions between China and Japan.  The only source that I have found with this topic was   http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2011/01/china%E2%80%99s-rise-remilitarizing-japan/.

Paper Topic

Wednesday, January 26th, 2011

Topic: Richmond Daughters of the Confederacy and their affect on Civil War memory in Richmond.

Sources:

Blight, David W. Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American History. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2001.

Cox, Karen L. Dixie’s Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2003.

Foster, Gaines M. Ghosts of the Confederacy: Defeat, the Lost Cause, and the Emergence of the New South. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987.

Graham, Sarah B, Alice W. Jones and Essie W. B. Smith. History of the Virginia Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy, 1895-1967. United Daughters of the Confederacy, 1968.

Janney, Caroline. Burying the Dead but not the Past: Ladies’ Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008.

Kinney, Martha E. “If Vanquished I Am Still Victorious”: Religious and Cultural Symbolism in Virginia’s Confederate Memorial Day Celebrations, 1866-1930.” The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 106, no. 3 (Summer 1998): pp. 237-266

Parrott, Angie. “‘Love Makes Memory Eternal’: The United Daughters of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia, 1897–1920,” in Edward Ayers and John C. Willis, eds. The Edge of the South: Life in Nineteenth-Century Virginia. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1991, 219–38.

Wilson, Charles Reagan. “The Religion of the Lost Cause: Ritual and Organization of the Southern Civil Religion, 1865-1920.” The Journal of Southern History 46, no. 2 (May 1980)

Understand Populat Culture: East Culture vs West Nature

Friday, January 14th, 2011

In Fiske’s article, Understanding Popular Culture, he discusses the emergence of designer jeans and the idea that people are being recognized by their social identity and relating this targeted social formation to values in jeans.  Thus the distinction between jeans in the east culture and west nature can further individualize one’s look, shape, and fit.  While the classic belief of western nature having a more rugged, tough, and hard-working versus the cultured, up-scaled, and urbanized eastern stereotype can still be found today, I believe the generalization has changed at least a little.  Western nature is seemingly being replaced by a culture of its own in the fact that news from Los Angeles and other major cities in the west have developed at a greater pace than the eastern city counterparts.  Silicon Valley is becoming extremely dynamic and the fashion industry is creating a new western identity everyday.  The cultural meaning of both sides of the American continent is changing for the western nature of jeans and other fashion trends is becoming increasingly the leading culture in the United States.