Archive for June, 2013

Reflection: “Neighbors”

Friday, June 28th, 2013

Neighbors by Jan Gross is a fascinating and captivating book describing a horrific episode of the Holocaust. The massacre of Jedwabne, Poland. According to Gross in 1941 the non-Jewish residents of this small town conspired and murdered the Jewish population.  One of the main points that Gross makes in the book is that this murder was not formulated directly by the Nazi’s as many in Poland had believed. This massacre was perpetrated by Poles against Poles. When this book was released, a wave of controversy in Poland fell on Gross. Obviously the Holocaust devastated Poland, and Gross seemed to put at least a portion of the blame on the Polish people themselves. People have attacked this work for other reasons, such as claiming that Gross has used improper figures, methodology, and historiography.  While the exact truth may never be known, I feel that works like Neighbors are invaluable to the historical community.  Discovering new perspectives on and countering established narratives is how we as a society truly learn about the past.

Jan Gross

Jan Gross

Reflection: Online Exhibition

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

For this reflection I looked at “Life After the Holocaust”. I chose this section because I find it very interesting to learn about how people try and move on after such experiences. I also have always been interested in oral histories such as this. The first thing that I found quite interesting was that some 80,000 survivors migrated to the United States between 1945 and 1950.  The online exhibition collected oral histories from many survivors who told their stories. Some of those oral histories I listened to were those of Thomas Buergenthal, Blanka Rothchild and Regina Gelb. These survivors, all children during the Holocaust, have incredible stories. All of the stories that I listened too showed the great success that these survivors were able to achieve after the Holocaust. Sharing their stories and having them preserved as a piece of oral history is invaluable to future generations. By looking in depth at the Holocaust, future generations can learn about  the conditions that led to the Holocaust, and therefore understand ways to prevent another catastrophe. Also by listening to these incredible stories future generations can learn ways to preserve after such destruction. All of these survivors went on to live happy and full lives, something that must have been made much harder by their experiences in the Holocaust.

Reflection: Online Exhibition

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

For this reflection I looked at “Life After the Holocaust”. I chose this section because I find it very interesting to learn about how people try and move on after such experiences. I also have always been interested in oral histories such as this. The first thing that I found quite interesting was that some 80,000 survivors migrated to the United States between 1945 and 1950.  The online exhibition collected oral histories from many survivors who told their stories. Some of those oral histories I listened to were those of Thomas Buergenthal, Blanka Rothchild and Regina Gelb. These survivors, all children during the Holocaust, have incredible stories. All of the stories that I listened too showed the great success that these survivors were able to achieve after the Holocaust. Sharing their stories and having them preserved as a piece of oral history is invaluable to future generations. By looking in depth at the Holocaust, future generations can learn about  the conditions that led to the Holocaust, and therefore understand ways to prevent another catastrophe. Also by listening to these incredible stories future generations can learn ways to preserve after such destruction. All of these survivors went on to live happy and full lives, something that must have been made much harder by their experiences in the Holocaust.

Reflection: “A Film Unfinished”

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

“A Film Unfinished” is a very well made and tremendously interesting film about the Holocaust. I thought that this film was quite powerful. Seeing the real images of people suffering in the horrible conditions of the Warsaw Ghetto was quite sad.  Focusing on a work of propaganda was an interesting choice and this showed the true power and importance these films had at the time.  The fact that the Nazis were purposefully trying to create a false reality of the Ghetto adds even more to the true horror of the Holocaust.  I also thought that having the survivors be interviewed about the footage added another level of realness to the film.  Seeing the sadness that is still with them after all these years was very saddening. One line in particular really stuck with me, one of the survivors has to cover her eyes when she is shown images of the dead in the Ghetto. She says that she is no longer immune to seeing images such as these and that she is actually happy that she can cry. I thought this was incredibly powerful, and made me think that I will never truly be able to understand the amount of horror that these people witnessed.

Pictorial Representation of the Holocaust

Monday, June 24th, 2013

auschwitz

The image that I chose to use for the pictorial representation of the Holocaust is a picture of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camp. This camp is one of the most notable symbols of the Holocaust because during the camps operation it was responsible for the death of over 1 million people. The image in particular that I chose is of the camp in modern day.  Having the picture be in modern day was a conscious choice shows that the horrors that once took place at this location are now over. Society has moved past such an awful moment in history. Yet the building still stands as a symbol of what was and as a reminder to what can happen under the worst circumstances.

History of Middle Eastern Warfare Paper: The British Campaign in the Sudan 1883-1898

Monday, June 24th, 2013

“So ‘ere’s to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy”: The British Campaign in the Sudan 1883-1898